Church Closed

The Holy Spirit and the Church

Alain Emerson -The Holy Spirit and the Church

The Holy Spirit is the one who ushers in the Kingdom of God. That Kingdom is present, although often hidden, in the church. The Holy Spirit is the one through whom God actively loves us in time. The Spirit is the way that the Trinity is revealed to us, pointing us always to the truth embodied in the Crucified, and leading us to the Father. By Godʼs love, we live in the Age of the Spirit, that new time in which the church exists and testifies to the world that our time is not our own. God has taken time for us and the sign of that divine intrusion is the Holy Spirit at work in the church that lives and works in the world. God through the Spirit draws us into the life of the Trinity, forming the people of God. The Spirit chooses to have a body on which the Spirit can rest. That body turns out to be called “church.”

[1]

In recent years, it has become common to talk about the church as both ‘gathered’ and ‘scattered.’ It’s helpful language in many ways as most will concur that church should be both a gathered community and a scattered dispersion of Jesus followers in their local communities. Often though this language becomes fashionable, impressive coffee-shop conversation focused more on how to ‘program’ both gathered and scattered expressions, but lacking the creative leading of the Holy Spirit. I’ve also heard it said you need to choose what kind of model you want to be—a city on a hill (emphasis on gathered expression of church, implying a well-oiled machine of great Sundays and a ministry program menu to back it up) or the salt of the earth (emphasis on scattered church expressions—‘church-wherever-we-are’ types and the dispersion of everyday missionaries into the spheres of influence).

I have always thought, Why not both? Is this not the biblical mandate? And I wonder if our pre-Covid church categories and cultural Christianity of 21st Century forced us too rigidly into one model, or often motivated us to establish one in reaction to the other? Is this season of deconstruction allowing us to reframe our understanding of church and re-centre our ecclesiology on something more akin to the normative patterns of the New Testament.

Our theology / ecclesiology is so important here. First of all, we are primarily the redeemed people of God, sinners rescued from darkness to form a new ‘covenant’ community based on the sacrificial love of Jesus. We are an alternative community, the ‘one new humanity’ living in this world as a counter-cultural vision of kingdom family, a signpost of how people will live together forever in the new heaven and earth. Sacrificial Love is therefore the axis for everything this community does and is. As Jesus taught us ‘people will know we are His if we love one another’ as he loves us. We are not just a random set of individuals scattered all over the place colliding once a week for some fellowship and pep-talk. The church is a people, a one-minded, one-hearted family baptised into one Spirit.

I am coming to realise that many streams of the church have focused on individual conversion and individual spiritual formation and even individual evangelism at the expense of building an actual community of the Holy Spirit. Remember the desert fathers who taught us the importance of solitude (monk, comes from ‘monos’ which means ‘alone’) and counter cultural spiritual formation in an empire-compromised church reached the point where they realised a life spent completely ‘solitary’ could only take them so far in their spiritual journey! Basically, they realised they needed other people to truly grow and thus the inspiring individual spiritual lives of St Anthony and others soon developed into inspiring spiritual communities. As John Finny put it – “the cells [of the Egyptian desert] became clumps (groups of monks meeting for fellowship) and the clumps became communities (the birthplace of communal monasticism as we know now it).”[2] In this context Jesus-followers became committed to a healthier form of spiritual formation. The raw elements of these communities intrigued the masses, from the poor and destitute to kings and queens and the DNA of these communities was exported into the soil of many nations all around Europe resulting in a meta-change in the cultural landscape.

My point is that as much as we, in the charismatic church, want to see a dispersion of scattered servants, carrying kingdom authority into every sphere of influence, gossiping the ‘good news’, healing the sick and confronting the powers and as much as we want to break the over-emphasised institutionalised form of the church (I get it!), we should not allow our reaction to this to pay less attention to the gathered church and its corporeal reality. The early church never assumed that ‘kingdom work’ could be done as isolated individuals, who simply ‘checked-in’ with one another for church on Sunday or worse simply watched an ‘online’ service. Rather the corollary to the spontaneous expansion of the early church was small communities of believers learning how to become one in Christ so they could reflect the life of Christ in the world.

Contrary to what many of us may think, it’s hard to deny Jesus spent as much time forming a community as he did proclaiming good news! This of course is not a dichotomy we need to force but rather a recognition that the proclamation of the kingdom flows from the formation of a Christlike community—Family on Mission. We can only accurately display the kingdom of God when we are committed to the community of the King because the community gives credibility to verbal proclamation. The one new humanity is what God is establishing on the earth to give glory to Himself. Of course, we are not talking about an insular-looking cozy community serving its own needs – rather a family loving one another into Christ-likeness, empowered by the Holy Spirit to proclaim the good news of the kingdom and to push back the kingdom of darkness. We must encourage everyone to do the work of the evangelist – but we must not forget the church as community is an evangelist—the body of Christ on earth, witnessing to his saving grace. Further the church is more than God’s agent of evangelism of social justice in the world, it is the agent of God’s entire cosmic purpose (Eph 3:10). The church’s pattern of life and commitment to loving one another serves as a countercultural structure to the political and social structures of the day. As Karl Barth describes, the church is ‘the provisional representation of the sanctification of all humanity.’[3] Therefore in its very ‘being’ the church should be prophetic and evangelistic.

Yes, we must absolutely equip the church to scatter into society and leaven the lump of the world, not ‘demanding’ or ‘imposing’ change but scattering the seeds of truth in the way (sacrificial love) of Jesus Christ—a love more powerful than any of the sin-systems of this world, even death itself! These seeds will plant roots in society and bring forth the fruit of change in the world. But where community is lacking and where there are no environments to nourish, the leaven can often become inactive and loses its flavour. In this season of lockdown and restrictions, with a lack of gathered environments, we are in danger of the church ‘losing its flavour’ as, in my experience ‘online church’ is not able to ‘salt’ God’s people as much as actual ‘sacramental’ community.

Practically, therefore, we need to adapt and think about how we establish our churches in these days which are built around family and where spiritual formation in the way of Jesus continues to happen in community, where it was also supposed to! This of course is more challenging in days of lockdown and restrictions, but what if we have an opportunity to make these environments better than what they were pre-Covid. While there are a host of advantages to how we pivot our technology in this season there is also the danger that church becomes even more a ‘spectator sport’ than it was pre-Covid! I really believe if we work hard, reform our patterns and gathered environments to engage more people in smaller, participatory groups built around Word and Spirit dynamics and establish these groups on the principles of discipleship and mission (the Great Commission), this could be an incredible moment for the church. What if we can maximise the opportunities to build these type of environments in this season, even if it is online, so at least the principles and practices are in place for once we get out of restrictions? If the last reformation put the word of God into people’s hands what if this is an opportunity to put it into people’s hearts?

If you are unsure how to do this, ask the Holy Spirit and give yourself to more rigorous Biblical reflection on the New Testament with your leadership team. The Holy Spirit specialises in granting wisdom for how the church is established and as we submit ourselves to the scriptures He will guide you in these uncertain but full-of-opportunity days! Ephesians 3:8-10 reminds us God grants those who are called to lead and serve His church a ‘mysterious’ wisdom in the administration (or planning /‘architecting’) of the ‘household of faith.’ Look to Him. He’s been waiting for a chance for us to put down the church growth books, break the clergy-laity divide, surrender whole-heartedly to His leading and pick up the New Testament again – it’s all in there! Also be aware of who God has placed in your church body; doubtless there are many mature people who haven’t yet been empowered, equipped, and challenged to lead and disciple others. Maybe now is the chance to deploy them into service – take a risk, call them into action alongside you and go for it! A new wineskin built on the reality of the priesthood of all believers, the gifts of the Holy Spirit in the radical servanthood of the Spirit of Jesus.

Maybe this is our reformation?

[1] Stanley Hauerwas and William H Willimon, The Holy Spirit (Abingdon, 2015).

[2] John Finny, Recovering the Past (Celtic and Roman Mission), (Darton,Longman & Todd, 2013)

[3] Karl Barth, Church Dogmatics v. 4: The Doctrine of Reconciliation. eds. Geoffrey William Bromiley and Thomas Forsyth Torrance (Edinburgh T. & T. Clark, 1958-1962), 614.

Alain Emerson WTC FacultyI’m Alain Emerson and I live in Northern Ireland where I help lead Emmanuel Church and also provide leadership for 24-7 Prayer in Ireland. I have the privilege of teaching at WTC on the module, ‘Shapes of the Church: Past, Present and Future,’ which is part of the Church Planting and Leadership Programme. As someone who has grown up in the
church and found myself in church leadership most of my adult life, I have a passion to see the body of Christ become all it was destined to be. I am fascinated by the many shapes of the church which have emerged throughout the centuries and the current
conversation. This has informed and inspired my own practice as a church leader, church planter and overseer over a network of churches. During these unique Covid days, I am convinced the Spirit is giving us an opportunity to reform many of our structures and patterns and yet the theological framework upon which we establish this is of utmost importance. This is a small contribution to the on-going conversation.

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Theological Miscellany is a blog where we post a variety of theological reflections on scripture, life, culture, politics, society, gender, and pretty much anything. WTC attracts a whole range of people as students and a wide range of faculty from around the world with different interests and theological leanings. What draws us all together is our commitment to a Christ-centred theology, taught in a Spirit-led fashion in partnership with the local church.

Find all posts HERE

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We offer programmes in ‘Kingdom Theology’ because at the heart of our study is the belief that Jesus came proclaiming the good news of the Kingdom of God. Through his life, death, and resurrection, he has brought the reality of the Kingdom to this world.

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Fan into flame the gift

Fan into flame the gift…

On a Sunday in early October, Mike Neelley and I went into Skagit County Jail together for our weekly services. Five men gathered around a stainless steel table cemented into the floor. We began with a prayer and then I passed out photocopies of 2 Timothy 1:6-14 – the passage on the gift of God.

I invite someone to read the first verse:

“For this reason I remind you to fan into flame the gift of God which is in you through the laying on of my hands.”

I offer a brief introduction by stating that God has gifts for all of us– spiritual gifts. These gifts are different from natural abilities, like being artistic, perceptive or a good communicator.  Spiritual gifts are distinct from learned skills like carpentry, welding, or auto mechanics. They include healing, prophesy, identifying evil spirits that afflict people, faith, and many others.

“Maybe some of you already know of a gift God has given you,” I suggest, looking around at blank faces.

“Or, maybe some of you still don’t know if God has given you a spiritual gift, and you’d like to receive something.”

The men seem to resonate with this option. I go on to share how these gifts enable us to become actively involved in God’s liberating work in the world,

I share how exercising a spiritual gift, like praying for someone to be healed or sharing a prophetic impression requires faith, which means taking risks. I ask someone to read the next verse:

“For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and love and discipline.”

Hearing these verses in the heart of the jail, with the TV blaring a football game suddenly made me feel vulnerable. I think I was then and there experiencing the kind of fear or timidity we’d just read about. The next verse seemed to expose and directly address the underlying issue:

Therefore do not be ashamed of the testimony of our Lord or of me His prisoner, but join with me in suffering for the gospel according to the power of God, who has saved us and called us with a holy calling.”

We talk about how natural it is to feel ashamed to believe in God’s liberating actions and of Jesus himself. You can feel like a fool believing in an invisible God.

Yet in the face of this Paul writes as an inmate himself, urging people not be ashamed. After all Jesus has saved us, and we need saving. Still when we respond to his call we do enter into a kind of suffering, which the apostle acknowledges.  But Christ Jesus “abolished death and brought life and immortality to light through the gospel.”

Suddenly I remember that the men hadn’t seemed aware that they had received a spiritual gift. I suggest that Mike and I would love to ask the Holy Spirit to reveal each person’s spiritual gift, and that we could gladly ask God to give new gifts.

The men all seemed eager to for whatever was going to happen next. Mike and I looked at each other and began to go for it, taking turns to speak prophetically over each man around the table.

Each man seemed to soak up the words of affirmation that Mike and I offered, agreeing with the gifts that we identified or spoke over them. We could see new hope ignited, there in this place of bleakness where negativity, harsh labels and curses abound.

Only one man joined us in “P pod”—a Mexican American guy with stars tattooed on his cheeks, barely visible under long curly black hair parted in the middle.  He is a man of deep conviction, born of suffering through years in prison.

Mike and I were moved by how easy it was to identify people’s spiritual gifts in the jail setting, and how precious and welcomed God’s perspective is among those who feel downtrodden.

We wrap up our time with each group by encouraging the men to step our in faith—fanning into flame their gifts. We encourage them to not let fear paralyze them, but God’s power, love and disciple.

Paul’s final words seem the perfect charge: “Guard, through the Holy Spirit who dwells in us, the treasure which has been entrusted to you.”

Mike and I find ourselves being deeply encouraged by this Scripture and our experience with the men. I share this message at Tierra Nueva’s service that day, and the work continues.

For further reflections on the gifts of the Spirit, read “Guerrilla tactics: signs, wonders, justice and mercy,” chapter nine in Guerrilla Gospel: Reading the Bible for Liberation in the Power of the Spirit.

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Levison Holy Spirit

Jack Levison on the Holy Spirit

In this WTCLive episode, hosted by Dr. Matt Lynch, Dr. Lucy Peppiatt, and Nick Crawley in a coffee shop in Bristol Old Testament scholar Jack Levison discusses his own journey in discovering more about the Bible and the Holy Spirit.

Guest:

Jack LevisonJack Levison
Southern Methodist University

Jack holds the W. J. A. Power Chair of Old Testament Interpretation and Biblical Hebrew at Perkins School of TheologySouthern Methodist University. Raised in a small tract house in Levittown, New York, Jack left to attend Wheaton College, where his Greek professor regaled him with stories of Cambridge University. At Christ’s College, Cambridge, Jack received the Fitzpatrick Prize for theology and was awarded a College Scholarship. When he returned from England to pursue doctoral studies at Duke University, Jack fell in love with a divinity student, Priscilla Pope, alongside of whom he now works at SMU.

Jack is an internationally recognized scholar, whose books have received wide acclaim. Scot McKnight, author of The Jesus Creed, characterized Filled with the Spirit as “the benchmark and starting point for all future studies of the Spirit.” Walter Brueggemann hailed it as “inspired.” Eugene Peterson called Fresh Air: the Holy Spirit for an Inspired Life “a rare and remarkable achievement.” Phyllis Tickle calls him “a brilliant and spirited theologian,” and N. T. Wright notes that Jack’s “account of the holy spirit–and what the spirit can do for whole churches, not just individuals!–is mature, seasoned, challenging, and wise.”

Jack has received many fellowships and grants from the National Humanities Center, the Lilly Fellows Program, the Louisville Institute, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the Rotary Foundation, the International Catacomb Society, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He recently directed, with Jörg Frey, an interdisciplinary, international research project on The Historical Roots of the Holy Spirit and is founding editor of a scholarly book series, Ekstasis: Religious Experience from Antiquity to the Middle Ages.

Jack’s books and teaching have a global reach. He has lectured around the States, as well as in Belgium, Canada, England, Germany, and Scotland. He has been an Honorary Visiting Lecturer at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, and a Von Humboldt Fellow at Ludwig Maximilians Universität in Munich, Germany. Several of his books have been translated into Spanish, Korean, and German.

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Craig Keener WTCLive!

Craig Keener – The Mind of the Spirit

 

The Mind of the Spirit

In this WTCLive episode, hosted by Dr. Lucy Peppiatt, New Testament scholar Craig Keener discusses his recent book The Mind of the Spirit: Paul’s Approach to Transformed Thinking (Baker Publishing Group, 2016) in which he looks at how the Holy Spirit functions from Paul’s perspective in the New Testament. Keener also discusses how the Holy Spirit has impacted his own life in a very personal way.


Guest:

Craig KeenerCraig Keener
Asbury Theological Seminary

Dr. Craig S. Keener (PhD, Duke University) is a professor of the New Testament at Asbury Theological Seminary. He is especially known for his work as a New Testament scholar on Bible background (commentaries on the New Testament in its early Jewish and Greco-Roman settings). His popular-level IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament (now available in a number of languages) has sold over half a million copies.

Craig has authored 18 books, four of which have won awards in Christianity Today. His recent books include Miracles: The Credibility of the New Testament Accounts (Baker Academic, 2011); The Historical Jesus of the Gospels (Eerdmans, 2009); The Gospel of Matthew: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary (Eerdmans, 2009); Romans (Cascade, 2009); 1-2 Corinthians (Cambridge, 2005); The Gospel of John: A Commentary (Hendrickson/Baker Academic, 2003).


Buy the book here:

The Mind of the Spirit

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Chris Kugler WTCLive

Chris Kugler – The Image of God in Paul

 

This episode of WTCLive comes to you from the student pub at WTC’s student residential (September 2016). Lucy Peppiatt, Matt Lynch and Brad Jersak interview Chris Kugler on the various aspects of his thesis, which looks at the Image of God in Paul’s writings and how that relates to a Sacramental Anthropology and Image Monotheism. Chris is also involved in a broader discussion amongst current New Testament scholars on Divine Christology and he argues for the bringing together of a high Christology and a high anthropology in Paul’s letters.


Chris Kugler PhD Candidate
New Testament

Chris holds a bachelor’s degree in Religious Studies and Biblical Languages, as well as two master’s degrees in Biblical Studies from Duke University and the University of St Andrews respectively. He is currently working on a PhD in New Testament at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, under N. T. Wright, where his research focuses particularly on Paul’s use of the Jewish and Greco-Roman imago Dei traditions in his Christology and theological anthropology. More broadly, his research interests include Jewish Monotheism, Jewish and Greco-Roman theological anthropology, Christology and Christian Origins. His primary passion is to help students encounter the New Testament in its rich and complex historical context. He is married to Katie Rae and both of them are based in Houston, Texas.


Rev. Brad Jersak PhD
New Testament and Patristics

Rev. Dr. Brad Jersak (Reader Irenaeus) is an author and teacher based in Abbotsford, Canada. He teaches New Testament and Patristics at WTC. After serving as pastor and church-planter for twenty years, he now travels for Fresh Wind Christian Fellowship and serves as reader at All-Saints Orthodox Monastery. Brad’s focus today is on writing accessible theology, facilitating ‘listening prayer’ seminars, and teaching college courses. His emphases are the Gospels, Cruciform theology , and contemplative spirituality applied to prophetic justice. He is currently editor of www.clarionjournal.com and senior editor Plain Truth Ministries (www.ptm.org).

Lucy Peppiatt PhD
Principal, Systematic Theology

Lucy has bachelor’s degrees in both English and Theology. She completed her MA in Systematic Theology at King’s College, London, and her PhD through the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Lucy is the author of Women and Worship at Corinth: Paul’s Rhetorical Arguments in 1 Corinthians. (Wipf and Stock, 2015); and The Disciple: On Becoming Truly Human. (Wipf and Stock, 2012). Lucy’s research interests are Christ and the Spirit, Charismatic theology, discipleship, and 1 Corinthians.

Matt Lynch PhD
Dean of Studies, Old Testament

Matt teaches Old Testament and serves as Dean of Studies at WTC. He recently moved from Germany, where he completed post-doctoral research on conceptions of divine supremacy in Persian period biblical literature. Matt is the author of Monotheism and Institutions in the Book of Chronicles (Mohr Siebeck, 2014) and various articles on the Old Testament. Matt is particularly interested in helping students grasp the theological and literary contours of the Old Testament, wrestle through its ethical and historical challenges, and understand its ongoing significance.

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More Christlike God

Brad Jersak – A More Christlike God: A More Beautiful Gospel

This episode of WTCLive comes to you from the student pub at WTC’s student residential (January 2016). Lucy Peppiatt and Matt Lynch discuss Brad’s recent book A More Christlike God: A More Beautiful Gospel (Plain Truth Ministries, 2015). Brad explains his journey toward writing this book, and how his perspective developed. Hear Matt, Lucy and Brad in a fun and lively discussion about Brad’s book.


A More Christlike God Book CoverBuy the book here:

A More Christlike God: A More Beautiful Gospel – Brad Jersak


Brad Jersak WTCRev. Brad Jersak PhD
New Testament and Patristics

Rev. Dr. Brad Jersak (Reader Irenaeus) is an author and teacher based in Abbotsford, Canada. He teaches New Testament and Patristics at WTC. After serving as pastor and church-planter for twenty years, he now travels for Fresh Wind Christian Fellowship and serves as reader at All-Saints Orthodox Monastery. Brad’s focus today is on writing accessible theology, facilitating ‘listening prayer’ seminars, and teaching college courses. His emphases are the Gospels, Cruciform theology , and contemplative spirituality applied to prophetic justice. He is currently editor of www.clarionjournal.com and senior editor Plain Truth Ministries (www.ptm.org).

Lucy Peppiatt WTC PrincipalLucy Peppiatt PhD
Principal, Systematic Theology

Lucy has bachelor’s degrees in both English and Theology. She completed her MA in Systematic Theology at King’s College, London, and her PhD through the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Lucy is the author of Women and Worship at Corinth: Paul’s Rhetorical Arguments in 1 Corinthians. (Wipf and Stock, 2015); and The Disciple: On Becoming Truly Human. (Wipf and Stock, 2012). Lucy’s research interests are Christ and the Spirit, Charismatic theology, discipleship, and 1 Corinthians.

 

Matt Lynch WTCMatt Lynch PhD
Dean of Studies, Old Testament

Matt teaches Old Testament and serves as Dean of Studies at WTC. He recently moved from Germany, where he completed post-doctoral research on conceptions of divine supremacy in Persian period biblical literature. Matt is the author of Monotheism and Institutions in the Book of Chronicles (Mohr Siebeck, 2014) and various articles on the Old Testament. Matt is particularly interested in helping students grasp the theological and literary contours of the Old Testament, wrestle through its ethical and historical challenges, and understand its ongoing significance.

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Women and Worship

Lucy Peppiatt – Women and Worship at Corinth

Women and Worship at Corinth

In this WTCLive episode: Matt Lynch interviews Lucy Peppiatt on her groundbreaking new book, Women and Worship at Corinth: Paul’s Rhetorical Arguments in 1 Corinthians (Wipf & Stock, 2015).

In this book, Lucy outlines an argument for reading key texts in 1 Cor 11 and 14 as supportive of the full participation of women in the life of the worshipping Church. She suggests that in 1 Corinthians Paul quotes and then refutes the misguided views of his opponents.


Speaker:

Lucy Peppiatt PhD

Principal, Systematic Theology

Lucy has bachelor’s degrees in both English and Theology. She completed her MA in Systematic Theology at King’s College, London, and her PhD through the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Lucy’s research interests are Christ and the Spirit, Charismatic theology, discipleship, and 1 Corinthians. She and her husband, Nick Crawley, lead Crossnet Anglican Church in Bristol. They have four sons.


Buy the book here:

Woman & Worship at Corinth

Creation Violence part 2

Richard Middleton & William Brown – Creation, Violence and the God of the Old Testament (Part 2)

With: Richard Middleton and William Brown.

In this WTCLive episode, Matt continues the discussion on the subject of creation, violence and God with two of his favourite Old Testament scholars. Creation and the question of violence occupy an important place in the work of these Old Testament gurus. Plus, they’ve both just come out with some fantastic new books that you’ll want to read to help you navigate these topics and to open up new worlds. Middleton’s book is A New Heaven and A New Earth: Reclaiming Biblical Eschatology (Baker 2014) and Brown’s is Wisdom’s Wonder: Character, Creation, and Crisis in the Bible’s Wisdom Literature (Eerdmans, 2014).

This is the second in our series on ‘Creation, Violence and God of the Old Testament’ (see part one here.)


Speakers

J. Richard Middleton, PhD

richard_middletonRichard earned a Ph.D. from the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, in a joint-degree program with the Institute of Christian Studies, Toronto. His other degrees include: M.A. in Philosophy, University of Guelph (Canada), 1985, and B.Th., Jamaica Theological Seminary, 1977. Dr. Middleton has done additional graduate studies in the Old Testament at Colgate Rochester Divinity School (1986-1988), and in religious studies and philosophy at Syracuse University (1984-1985).

He is widely published in religious periodicals and journals, as well as the author of four books. His most recent books are The Liberating Image: The Imago Dei in Genesis 1 (Brazos) and A New Heaven and a New Earth: Reclaiming Biblical Eschatology (Baker Academic). He has edited a volume of essays on Caribbean Theology for Pickwick Publications, and is working on a manuscript for Abingdon Press on the dynamics of human and divine agency in the books of 1 and 2 Samuel. Special areas of interest are Old Testament theology, the Christian worldview, the books of Genesis and Samuel, the doctrine of Creation, and Christianity and postmodern culture. He also serves as an adjunct professor of Old Testament at the Caribbean Graduate School of Theology in Kingston, Jamaica, and is the president of the Canadian Evangelical Theological Association.

William P. Brown, PhD

william_p_brown_bwWilliam earned his Ph.D. at Emory University, his MDiv from Princeton Theological Seminary, and his BA from Whitman College. He has abiding interests in the use of scripture in the life of the church and the world, particularly in the context of ecology and justice. Specific interests include creation theology, faith and science dialogue, the Psalms, and wisdom literature (Proverbs, Job, and Ecclesiastes).  Recent books include The Seven Pillars of Creation: Bible, Science, and the Ecology of Wonder (Oxford University) and Wisdom’s Wonder (Wm. B. Eerdmans). Recently, he helped Columbia Seminary earn one of 10 grants totalling $1.5 million awarded by the American Association for the Advancement of Science to integrate science into the seminary’s curriculum.

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